English Idioms Daily Blog

... your resource for English idioms, ESL and more!

Navigation

Buy Something

Fotolia_136015_S
Contrary to the picture above, today’s idiom has nothing to do with shopping!
In addition to its literal meaning of
to purchase, the English phrase to buy something also means to believe something. Most often, it is used in the negative form as in not to buy something or not to believe something. Look at these sample sentences to see this expression in use:

1. She says that she couldn’t come to the party because she is ill, but I
don’t buy it.
2. I don’t buy politicans’ promises anymore.
3. I don’t buy that excuse for being late.

Since we are constantly confronted with statements and situations that we may or may not believe, the phrase to
buy something is a useful addition to your list of English idioms.

Do you buy
the following quote? Why or why not? Could you say that you partly or partially buy it?

It’s choice - not chance - that determines your destiny.
-Jean Nidetch, Founder of Weight Watchers








blog comments powered by Disqus