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A Bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush

English Idioms Bird

Idioms are often found in comics, cartoons and jokes. There are three English idioms in the comic above. Could you identify them? In case you didn’t, here they are:

1. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
2. to kill two birds with one stone
3. Birds of a feather flock together.

Have you heard these English idioms before? Over the next three days, we are going to look at these three English
bird idioms. Let’s start with the first one: a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. It is a proverb that means the things you already have are worth more than the things you only hope to get; in other words, be happy with what you have. It’s very likely better than what you might get.

Here are two sample sentences to demonstrate the use of
a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush:

1. The customer offered only $1000 for the car. The salesman, however, accepted this low offer because he felt that
a bird in the hand was worth two in the bush.
2. I didn’t really like the dress, but I decided to buy it. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

Now that you have looked at the meaning of the idiom
a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, you can, perhaps, laugh when you look at the comic above when the one bird says Hey look at me! I’m worth more than them put together!.

Interestingly, there is a small village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania named Bird-in-Hand. According to the village’s website
www.bird-in-hand.com, the village’s name dates back to 1734 when two road surveyors were discussing where they should spend the night - in the present location or somewhere else. One of them said a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. The other surveyor followed this bit of advice and both remained at what became known as the Bird-in-Hand Inn . The village was later founded with the name Bird-in-Hand.

Tomorrow, we will continue to look at English bird idioms when we examine to kill two birds with one stone.





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