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Ideas for Teachers: Creative Writing Exercises with English Idioms

Creative Writing exercises with English idioms

There are many ways to inspire children to learn about the English language, but fun is almost always guaranteed when you are able to incorporate English idioms into your lesson plan. Below, you’ll find three great ideas to get younger students interested in the English language and writing:

Idea 1 - Write a Story Based on a Given English Idiom
Present a list of proverbs or funny English idioms. Discuss the meanings of each of the listed English expressions and, then, ask the students to write a short story using one of the English idioms on the list as the title, while, at the same time, using it in the story.

Some good English proverbs might be:

  • All that glitters is not gold.
  • You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.
  • Home is where the heart is.
  • There is no point crying over spilt milk.
  • The early bird catches the worm.
Some good funny English idioms might be:
  • cool as a cucumber
  • couch potato
  • a pain in the neck
  • man’s best friend
  • copycat









Idea 2 - Write a Story that Incorporates a Given List of English Idioms
Present and discuss a list of 10 English idioms and ask the students to write a short story that incorporates 5 of them. Your list could include the following English idioms, for example:

  • fresh as a daisy
  • to hit the hay
  • to save the day
  • tickled pink
  • no more Mr. Nice Guy
  • worrywart
  • to pull a rabbit out of a hat
  • to spill the beans
  • to clown around
  • party pooper

Idea 3 - Idiom Guessing Game
Provide the students with a list of 10 English proverbs. Discuss each of the ones on the list as a group and, then, ask the students to write a short story that is intended to teach the proverb - but without specifically using it. Then, read each of the finished stories out loud as a group and ask the students to guess which proverb is meant. Your list of proverbs could be:

  • All that glitters is not gold.
  • You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.
  • Home is where the heart is.
  • There is no point crying over spilt milk.
  • The early bird catches the worm.
  • When the cat is away, the mice will play.
  • Never look a gift horse in the mouth.
  • Where there is a will, there is a way.
  • Actions speak louder than words.
  • One good turns deserves another.

The following links could be useful is you are looking for further ways to inspire students to learn English idioms:

Idiom Quiz for Kids
A Short Story with Idioms - for Kids
How to Inspire Students to Love Language and the Arts


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